State Theatre, Minneapolis, Minnesota - May 2, 1925

State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

Published by Finkelstein and Ruben

MOVIELAND MAGAZINE

RAYMOND GRIFFITH
in
"THE NIGHT CLUB"
A Feature of LAFF WEEK
Next week at the STATE


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

DIRECTING A BEETLE

IT REQUIRED but one rehearsal to cause a mama dinosaur as big as ten elephants to take her daughter into a stream for a Saturday night bath. But it took a day and a half, and practically all of the picture staff's patience to induce a one-inch beetle to crawl from Lewis Stone's arm onto his plate of beans.

Earl Hudson experienced these two extremes while filming "The Lost World", adapted from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fantastic story of that name, with the wilds of South Africa as the interesting locale. A batch of peculiarly marked beetles were obtained for the purpose. It seems, however, that live beetles are not as amenable to directions as dinosaurs.

MOVIELAND MAGAZINE

An F&R phootplay (sic) weekly published in behalf of State Theatre patrons at the State Theatre, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Edited by the Finkelstein and Ruben Department of Publicity.


Doris Kenyon in the State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

UNUSUAL DRAMATIC HEIGHTS ARE ATTAINED BY DORIS KENYON, POPULAR SCREEN actress of the younger school, in the role of the wife opposite Milton Sills in the picture, "I Want My Man".


Richard Barthelmess in State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

ADMIRERS OF RICHARD BARTHELMESS WILL HAVE OPPORTUNITY OF WITNESSING THE TALENTED YOUNG CINEMA STAR INA MOST SUITABLE FILM VEHICLE WHEN "Soul Fire" is released for exhibition. As its title suggests, the picture is exceedingly emotional.


Clive Brook in State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

As Rudolph Solomon in Corinne Griffith's latest picture, "Declasse," Clive Brook, distinguished English actor, enhances his reputation as a screen player.


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

BREAKING INTO THE SILENT DRAMA

By JESSE L. LASKY

First Vice President of Paramoune Pictures Corp.

"Screen aspirants should not go to the studios; the studios will be brought to them."

I HAVE BEEN in the motion picture business for fifteen years. In all that time the question I have been asked most frequently is:

"How can I get into the movies?"

My first advice is paradoxical. You probably won't believe it. However, here is is:

"If you want to get into the movies, don't go to Hollywood!"

Probably this advice is futile. Nevertheless, I am deeply in earnest when I tell you that not only are you not wanted in Hollywood, but that you can still get into motion pictures without going there.

This also may sound contradictory, but I shall explain what I mean later. I say, "Don't go to Hollywood," because the problem of the screen-struck girl is one of the greatest and the most heart-breaking facing the studios.

In their ambition and determination for a screen career, thousands of young folks have left their homes and gone to Hollywood. Most of them have returned, completely disillusioned and disheartened.

They have accomplished little or nothing toward reaching their goal. They have wasted a lot of time and money. They have brought endless worriment to their people, and it has all been in vain.

The motion picture producers have done all in their power to warn ambitious boys and girls not to go to California, but these warnings have failed to prevent aspiring young people from venturing forth to the great picture-making colony of the West.

The situation has become so serious, indeed, that the producers, fining numerous girls stranded in Hollywood, penniless and without means of support, have built a large home to shelter these ambitious but misguided girls, until their families are able to send them enough money to return home.

Now, the reason we don't want you to go to Hollywood is this:

When the average girl goes out to the studios, she is utterly ignorant of

(continued on Page 20)


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

GEORGE FITZMAURICE PLANS "MOTIF" CINEMAS

"Audiences have been education to expect a definite mood in pictures which reflects everyday life."

GEORGE FITZMAURICE, who is in New York on a vacation, after completing the Samuel Goldwyn production, "His Supreme Moment," comes forward with a new idea in picture production which in its conception is drastic and revolutionary.

In his next picture he is planning to make what he terms a "motif" production.

Mr. Fitzmaurice has been credited with bringing many new thoughts into picture making from a directorial standpoint. His settings have always been original in creation and conception. His lighting effects have brought new experiments in the wake of his success. His artistic combination of technical effects with dramatic action have given his pictures a verve which has stamped all George Fitzmaurice productions with a definite distinction.

His latest thought for the making of "motif" pictures had its germ idea in "His Supreme Moment," featuring Ronald Colman and Blanche Sweet. This picture, soon to be released by First National, gives inklings of how the plan will crystallize in future productions.

"I intent to make 'motif' pictures," said Mr. Fitzmaurice, "because I believe audiences have been educated to expect a definite mood in pictures which reflects a major or minor strain in national and everyday life. This keynote, as a 'motif' in musical composition, built around the central plot, will radiate from each and every one of my future productions.

"In 'His Supreme Moment' I have tried to show concretely the first intimation of what I intend 'motif' pictures to be. Here is a drama which could be the drama of any man or woman. I have a central situation which is novel and distinctive, touching on the trial marriage idea. To dramatize this effect throughout and maintain a constant play on the emotions, I introduce color in a way which I believe has never before been used on the screen. The action calls for a play-within-the-film, with spectators watching the actors. The play and actors are in a blaze of full color; the spectators in black and white. By the technique of 'cut and flash' action, first from color then to black and white, I emphasize the drama, intensify the re-actions and sustain the interest to poignant climaxes.

"In my future productions, I will go much further and perfect this 'motif' idea, in a similar manner, as it recurs again and again in a musical symphony. Besides using color, I intend to use slow motion to reflect that mood of life; I intend using extra rapid action to convey that impression of life's turmoil; and, finally, I will introduce stereoscopic scenes in which the characters on the screen appear to leap toward the audience. This latter idea is now in the experimental stage. When my experiments are completed I hope to visualize all of these elements of color, slow motion, speed and stereoscopic effects in one picture, because all of these elements are the tempo of life and drama, which, to be most effective, must mirror the keynote moods of life."

Mr. Fitzmaurice is spending his time in New York seeing plays, visiting the art salons, renewing old friendships, and resting. This is his first trip to Manhattan in over a year.


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

DUKE OF CHECKERGOVINIA TO CONTINUE IN PICTURES

FIRST NATIONAL PICTURES has recently added several important names to its distinguished list of contract players. Its line of players is one of the most imposing at the service of any producing company.

Players recently placed under contract are Leon Errol, Mary Astor, Robert Frazer, Victor McLaglen, Charles Murray, Joyce Compton and Hugh Allen.

Leon Errol is one of the foremost musical somedy stars of the day, at present starring in Florenz Ziegfeld's production of "Louie the 14th" in New York. He made his screen debut with Colleen Moore as the Duke of Checkergovinia in First national's production of "Sally," which has quickly established itself as one of the season's biggest box-office attractions. Mr. Errol played the same role in the screen version of "Sally" that he did in Mr. Ziegfeld's production of the musical comedy. His hit in the motion picture was as great as was his stage interpretation of the part. First National believes that in signing Mr. Errol it has obtained the services of a comedian who will quickly take his place with the ablest and most popular of film comedians, adding material strength to its product.

Mary Astor recently played the feminine lead in two Thomas H. Ince productions for First National - "Entiement" and "Playing With Sould." She came into prominence through her acting opposite Richard Barthelmess in "The Bright Shawl," and has since played important roles in productions by various companies. Among them were "Second Fiddle" and Puritan Passions" for Hodkinson, "Success" for Metro, and "Rupert of Hentzau" for Selznick. MissAstor is at the present time playing the lead with Douglas Fairbanks in his new production, "Don Q." She is slated for the lead in a First Natioanl picture for the new season, "The Unguarded Hour," by margaretta Tuttle. The company has other imiportant roles in view for her and believes that she is destined to become one of the most popular of the feminine screen stars.

Tully Marshall, screen actor, and husband of Marion Fairfax, editorial director for Earl Hudson's unit of First National, told some of the thrilling incidents of his screen carerr over the radio the other evening in connection with the weekly program of the Crandall Theatres in Washington, D.C. Marshall was the third screen celebrity to speak on these programs which feature one star each week.


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

"HIS SUPREME MOMENT"

Ha! Ha! Ha! He Imaginges Himself in love with her.

THE STRANGEST LOVE PACT MAN AND MAID EVER MADE

JOHN DOUGLAS, mining engineer, returns to New York from South American to secure financial backing for a mine he has discovered. While attending the theatre with a wealthy man-about-town, Harry Avon, and a young heiress, Sara Deeping, Douglas meets the star of the play, Carla King, and falls head over heels in love with her. Sara's jealousy is aroused.

Sara secretly puts up the money for Douglas' mining venture. He rushes to Carla to tell her of his love. While she loves him, she is afraid of love and refuses to marry him but finally makes the quixotic proposal that she accompany him to South America as his "sister" and spend a year there with this impersonal relationship in effect as a test of their affections.

In South American, Carla speedily loses her beauty in the grind of primitive housekeeping. Souglas is worried by business cares and the strained relationship with Carla. He tries just once to persuade Carla to marry him but she insists on the year's time limit. The native workers mutiny and Carla saves Douglas in a fierce fight.

Sara conceives the idea of visiting Douglas at the mine and arrives while Carla is convalescing from a tropical fever. By contrast, she is very feminine and appealing. She discovers Carla's presence and pretends a friendship which masks her hatred for Carla. Sara persuades both of them to return to New York with her, and Douglas and Carla agree that their test has been a failure.

During Carla's absence, her mother, Betty King, has replaced her on the stage. The return of the younger Carla arouses an unnatural hatred in the heart of the jealous mother. How- (continued on Page 20)


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

PERSUADING MOVIE BABIES TO ACT FOR THE CAMERA

IRVING CUMMINGS

Discusses the peculiarities of the Child Actor

DESPITE the universal belief to the contrary, babies, even motion picture babies, are not good actors. The screen child is much like the reader's own. It is willful, obstinate and at time singularly lacking in apparent intelligence. But is is susceptible to suggestion. That is the one quality that a child actress must have. That is the one important particular in which it differs from less gifted children.

Irving Cummings, noted director, discussed the peculiarities of the child actor and the difficulties of the director who must get him, or her, to do certain things before the camera, between scenes of "Just a Woman," the M. C. Levee production for First National which he is making at the United Studios, one day this week.

Baby Dorothy Brock, a four-year-old who has appeared in ten pictures in little more than a year, is before the camera in "Just a Woman" almost as much as the leading characters, portrayed by Conway Tearle and Claire Windsor. Cummings turned to his experiences with her for much of his recital.

"One important scene required that Baby Dorothy - who plays a four-year-old boy, by the way - to be sound asleep," Cummings said. "I told her, her mother told her, her nurse told her, that she must close her eyes and remain perfectly quiet. The orchestra played a lullaby. But curiosity, which is just as strong in screen babies as it is in all others, was too much for her. Twelve times the camera started grinding on the scene with Baby Dorothy's eyes securely closed and her breath coming slowly. Twelve times she flickered an eye to see what was going on.

"My nerves were on edge and so were her mother's. And we were keeping a staff of people that cost us nearly a thousand dollars an hour, waiting.

"So I took the one remedy for the situation that I have always found to work. I crawled into bed beside Baby Dorothy, put my arm over her and feigned sleep. In fifteen minutes she was asleep - and the cameraman had to call me. But the trick worked and we got the scene."

Sometimes it takes the whole producing personnel to put a child actress into the mood that will enable it to act naturally. Baby Dorothy was fretful and occupied with her dolls one day with Mr. Cummings wanted her to romp and play. She romped at command, but didn't put the spirit into it that would make it appear natural. So Cummings sent to the property room and a lot of toys, and for ten minutes he and half a score of other members of the company amused Baby Dorothy with their antics. Mr. Cummings beat a drum. His secretary, Edna Mae Strauss, punched a squawking bear. The cameraman produced a Jack-in-the-box. The orchestra drew near and imitated a dog fight. A crowing hen and all of the other funny thins that could think of. When Baby Dorothy started to laugh, Cummings knew the battle was won!

 Doris Kenyon, who was stricken with appendicitis the day she was to start work for First National in "The Half-Way Girl," is practically recovered. She expects to be able to start work on the picture in about two weeks.


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

IT STARTS SATURDAY - LAFF WEEK

10 RIOTOUS MIRTH-PROVOKING UNITS10

OVERTURE
A Novelty That Will Make You Smile

DIGEST
An Unreal Newsreel Full of Chuckles

STATE SNICKERS
Oh, How You'll Snicker!

ORGAN NOVELTY
A Big Laugh About Eyes

"ZOWIE"
A Third Dimension Novelty That Will Make You Shriek

HAM HAMILTON
in "KING COTTON" Filmdom's Favorite Fool

OSMAN BANJO DUO
Picking Their Way Through Harmony Land
A Breathing Spell - You'll Need It

RAYMOND GRIFFITH
in "THE NIGHT CLUB"
Go Ahead, Roar - You're Among Friends

CROSSWORD PUZZLE
The Laugh Is On You

PEN AND INK VAUDEVILLE
For Those Who Laugh Last

COMEDY STAR AT STATE NEXT WEEK

Raymond Griffith has created a sensation in motion picture circles recently with his flare (sic) for comedy, which, for some reason or other, has been hidden under the proverbial bushel for a long time, and now people are beginning to ask: "How does he do it?"

Griffith has a marvelous sense of disaster. He always has the sword of Damacles hanging over his head. He builds up a situation to get happiness for himself or someone else and then disaster overtakes him, which makes the laugh. He is never satisfied with just a fall or a smash in the jaw to get a laugh, but he takes time to put something in front of the gag. He makes a lieele drama out of every situation, which always turns into a howling laugh on him.

Griffith's method of getting a laugh differs radically from that of Chaplin or Lloyd. Chaplin depends upon satire and the ridiculous figure of the man who thinks he's dressed up when he has holes in his gloves and not trousers to his dress suit. Lloyd goes in for weakness of character - the man who is afraid of women, the coward, for his chief laugh getting antics. Griffith, however, is the happy person, who always has a hot of bright ideas and is always fixing things for other people. He is the dapper young man with silk hat and striped trousers.

ERNEST, THE USHER, SAYS-

"Folks always appreciate courtesy. The reason we fellow are here is because we can deliver it."


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

STATE THEATRE

Minneapolis, Minn.

TWIN CITY AMUSEMENT TRUST ESTATE
Proprietor

FINKLESTEIN & RUBIN, Managers
THEO. L. HAYS, General Manager

A playhouse exquisite in appointments and dignified in courtesy and service, dedicated to the most advanced exposition of "Motion Pictures De Luxe."

Presenting the most recent and pretentious creations of the "silent drama," embellished win exhibition with distinctive musical expressions, artistic atmospheric preludes, and the most notable vaudeville and concert divertissements.

PERSONNEL

CLEMENT P. MURPHY, Managing Director
J. WILLIAM HOUCK, Manager
A. D. KVOOL, House Manager

E. J. Cornell

Superintendent

R. S. Hess

Stage Manager

George Miller

Electrical Engineer

Wm. (William) Warvelle Nelson

Conductor

Wm. (William) Dirks

Assistant Conductor

John Linderman

Concert Master

E. J. Dunstedter

Organist

Elsie Thompson

Assistant Organist

Wallace Yutzy

Projectionist

Wood Smith

Projectionist

Albert D. Hipp

Scenic Artist

Harry Walters

Lobby Artist

Things You Should Know

Complete change of program every Saturday. 
State entertainment embraces the most distinctive features of screen and vaudeville.
Doors open daily at 11:45 a.m.
Performances start at noon.
Saturday De Luxe -- 2:30 - 7:00 - 9:00
Sunday De Luxe - 3:00 - 7:00 - 9:00
Week Day De Luxe - 2:30 - 7:00 - 9:00
Ladies' retiring room at left of Mezzanine floor.
Gentleman's smoking room at right of Mezzanine floor.
Service of graduate nurse available upon application to chief page.
Doctors who expect calls should leave name with Manager.

THEO L. HAYES,
General Manager, F. & R.

STATE THEATER PRICES
Evenings, Sundays and Holidays
50c
Week Day Matinees
35 c

STATE THEATRE 
PROGRAM

CURRENT WEEK BEGINNING SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1925

CLEMENT P. MURPHY
Managing Director, State Theatre
takes pleasure in offering

A
OVERTURE
Excerpts from the life and music of GEORGE FREDERICK HANDEL
Famous Music Masters Series

Various incidents in the life of the great music master are shown on the screen, accompanied by some of Handel's greatest music. The scenes represented are all authentic, not fanciful, and the music comprises selections from the "Sonata," comprises selections from the "Sonata," the celebrated "Largo," concluding with the glorious "Hallelujah Chorus."

State Theater Orchestra, William Warvelle Nelson Conducting

B
STATE THEATRE DIGEST
State Studio's compilation of pictorial news of the week, edited from the standpoint of entertainment and general interest, with a psychological arrangement of its salient features.

C
ORGAN NOVELTY
"LET IT RAIN, LET IT POUR"
Mr. E. J. Dunstedter on the Mighty Wurlitzer

D
"WIDE AWAKE"
A Mermaid Comedy

E
COLLETTA
And Her JAZZ-O_MANIA REVUE

F
NORMA TALMADGE
in
"THE LADY"

THE CAST

NORMA TALMADGE

Polly Perl

Wallace MacDonald

Leonard St. Aubyns

Alf Goulding

Tom Robinson

Dorris Lloyd

Fannie LeClair

Walter Long

Blackie

George Hackathorne

Leonard Cairns

Marc McDermott

Mr. Wendover

Paulette Duval

Madame Adrienne Chatellier

John Fox, Jr.

Freckles

Emily Fitzroy

Madame Blanche

John Herdman

John Cairns

Margaret Seddon

Mrs. Cairns

Edwin Hubbell

London Boy

Miles McCarthay

Mr. Graves

G
"CROSS-WORD PUZZLE"
*CHINA 'CROSS THE BAY
A Unique Dream of the Orient
*(Shown only during intermediate performances)


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

Special Reductions

On Sprint Garments for 30 Days
Only on Work Brought in Our Office or Branches and Called For
Men's Suits French Dry Cleaned and Pressed 75c
Ladies' Suits, plain$1
Wool Dresses, plain$1
Ladies' Spring Plain overcoats$1

HATS, RUGS, DRAPES, CURTAINS, DYEING, TAILORING, RELINING, DONE AT SPECIAL PRICES.

WE CALL AND DELIVER -

Should you desire us to call for and deliver, following prices will apply on cleaning and pressing:
Men's Suits or "Top Coats$1
Ladies' Suits$1.25
Wool Dresses, plain$1.25
Ladies' Spring Coats$1.25

Majestic DYE HOUSE
Main Office and Plant:
1217 Nicollet Avenue
Atlantic 2922
Branch: 1721 Chicago Avenue.  South 6554

"His Supreme Moment"
(Continued from Page 13)

ever, the two are persuaded to co-star in a new play.

Sara has successfully intrigued Douglas and he imagines himself in love with her. He is seeking more capital to continue his mining operations. Carla agrees to marry Avon if the latter will back Douglas, and Avon agrees. Avon tricks Carla into an embrace which Douglas sees as he enters Avon's apartment.

At the opening performance of the two Carla's new play, mother and daughter suddenly understand each other and the mother, realizing that Carla loves Douglas, sends for him after the performance. Sara follows him and a terrific three-cornered scene ensues. But Douglas learns that Carla loves him and will marry him. With independent financial backing for the mine, they return to South America on their honeymoon.

Breaking Into the Silent Drama

(Continued From Page 9)

film requirements. She would like to act in the movies and she feels she is capable of doing so. Her friends and her family have encouraged her. But she does not know where to begin. She is ignorant of nearly everything that is necessary for screen success. All she has is hope, and a sublime faith in herself.

In Los Angeles she finds thousands of girls, more beautiful than herself, besieging the studios for employment in any capacity.

The studios are so busy turning out pictures and casting actors for important roles that they have little time to consider the unknown girl. The result is that our newcomer haunts the studios and gains her little store of screen experience in the most hit-or-miss fashion.

You probably have heard all this before, but it may be news to you that,

(continued on page 29)


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

About the Theatre

By MANAGER J. WILLIAM HOUCK

Next week will be laugh week! We have been having a lot of fun getting funny things together for you folks to have fun with next week. Hope none miss Laugh Week because you are sure to have a good time if you come.

Speaking of dancers, did you know that Corinne Griffith was once a professional dancer? She won her way into pictures through a beauty contest conducted in her home town, Texarkana, Texas. In "Declasse," Miss Griffith's natural beauty is enhanced by some very stunning gowns designed especially for her by Madame Francis and Gilbert Clark, eelebrated New York modistes. The cast of the production includes such well-known favorites as Lloyd Hughes, Clive Brook, Rockliffe Fellowes, Hedda Hopper, Gale Henry, Louise Fazenda, and Eddie Lyons.

It has just been announced that the old Vitagraph Company has been purchased by Warner Brothers. This marks the passing of one of the oldest producing organizations in the business. In the days when John Bunny was a popular comedian, Vitagraph was making pictures.

State Theatre will find Miss Very Cool right on the job this summer. This refreshing miss will meet them as they enter the theatre and will contribute to their comfort as long as they remain. To escape the Summer heat, one has only to make an appointment with Miss Very Cool for any afternoon or evening at the State.

A GOOD ILLUSTRATION IS YOUR BEST SALESMAN
LET US ILLUSTRATE YOUR ADVERTISING

STAR ENGRAVING CO.

ETCHINGS   HALF-TONES
ATLANTIC 6580
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.

To the Family
who want to build or improve their HOME

Bring your problems to us for:

Competent Advice
Satisfactory Materials
Reasonable Prices
Liberal Terms
Thompson Lumber Company

917 Washington Avenue
Southeast


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

Current Attractions

Heralded as the most successful picture farce of the season, "Charley's Aunt" holds the screen for the week at the Garrick Theatre. Based on Brandon Thomas' play, the vehicle reveals Syd Chaplin, the brother of the illustrious Charlie, in the title role.

A host of film celebrities including Alma Rubens, Frank Mayo, H. B. Warner, Walter MacGrail and Lilyan Tashman are to be seen at the Strand Theatre in the ciname attraction, "Is Love Everthing."  Many spectacular incidents including experiences aboard a rum runner and a sinking yacht are thrilling features of the production.

"The Bridge of Sighs, " the picturization of Charles K. harris' dramatic story of the same name, is offered at the New Lyric Theatre. Creighton Hal and Dorothy Mackaill interpret the leading roles and are given capable support by a cast including Alec B. Francis, Richard Tucker, Ralph Lewis and Aileen Manning.

Milton Sills and Viola Dana are to be seen at the New Astor Theatre in "As Man Desires." The production was adapted from the novel, "Pandora La Croix," and depicts a vivid tale of a hunted army officer who is forced to find refuge in the tropics. Supporting the two popular film stars are Ruth Clifford, Rosemary Theby (sic) Paul Nicholson, Tom Kennedy, Hector Sarno and Frank Leigh.

Neighborhood Theatres; Loring, "Sackclock and Scarlet," Sun., Mon., Tues.; "Men and Women," Wed., Thurs.; "Forty Winks," Fri., Sat.  Lagoon, "As Man Desires," Sun., Mon., Tues.; "Dark Swan," Wed., Thurs.; Dixie Handicap," Fri., Sat. Rialto "Sackcloth and Scarlet," Sun., Mon., Tues.; "Men and Women," Wed., Thurs., "Lighthouse by the Sea," Fri. Sat. Lyndale, "Goose Hangs High," Sun., Mon.; "Miss Bluebeard," Tues., Wed.; "The Turmoil," Thurs., Fri.; "The Fast Worker," Sat.

The Men Get a Bonus of 20% for Driving Safely

Red Top Cab

ATlantic 4000

Western Electric Company

Radio broadcasting equipment makes it possible for you to enjoy the F. & R. Family program every Friday evening from station WCCO, Minneapolis-Saint Paul.

ENJOY YOUR LOCAL BROADCASTING


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

SWANSON'S
1031 Nicollet
THE HOUSE OF FLOWERS

WE wish to announce that our Newly Furnished Store on the corner of Eleventh Street and Nicollet Avenue is now open. We trust we will have the pleasure to serve you in the future, and will deem it a privilege to have you visit us at our new store.
FLOWERS MOTHER'S DAY -- BETTER STOCK
Mother's Day Sunday, May 10th

PETERS'
Beauth Craft and Hair Goods Store
You will find an atmosphere of refinement combined with ineligent service at "Peters," the newest, largest sanitary ground floor Beauty Parlor in the Northwest. For appointments phone Main 0251.
A BEAUTIFUL PERMANENT WAVE IN OIL BY THE MOST MODERN METHOD
Mrs. Peters, Nine Years Owner of Beauty Parlor at the Dayton Co.
35 South Eighth Street
Minneapolis

When You Want a Nice Meal
Go to the 
Hong Kong Cafe
A GOOD PLACE TO EAT
Chicken Chow Mein taken out ..... 25c
Noon Day Lunch ..... 35c
Dinner ..... 65c
819 HENNEPIN AVE.
Phone: Atlantic 5171

The Homecoming of Gloria Swanson
(Continued From Last Week)

"How well we have succeeded must be told by the film itself. However, I am proud to say that on the last day of our work on the picture, an officer of the French army came to the studio and with the entire company assembled, pinned on my saist a decoration signifying that I had been elected to the French Academy. To me, that was a wonderful thrill, and you may be sure that I am indeed grateful and happy at this recognition of what we have tried to do.

"There is one thing above everything else that I should like to tell my friends in the United States. When I was ill in the hospital in a little suburb outside of Paris I receive (sic) thousands of cables and letters from all over Europe and all over the United States, expressing sympathy and best wishes. many of these were written by children, some by people whose hands apparently faltered in writing, and most of them by people whom I had never heard of. I can never express the feeling of gratitude whi I have toward these wonderful people who remembered me in my sickness; to me it was the most heart-warming experience of my life."

Dorothy Mackaill, now playing the feminine lead in "The Making of O'Malley" for First National, is going to play opposite Richard barthelmess in "Shore Leave."


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

Breaking into the Silent Drama
(continued from Page 20)

despite all this, the greatest problem of picture producers today is to find new faces, new people, new personalities for the screen.

Any young man or woman with exceptional good looks, acting talent, and personality, has a brighter chance to win fame on the screen today than ever before.

Every producer and director will cheerfully go far out of his way to encourage and sign to a contract the young person having the necessary essentials of a successful screen career.

In plain words, if you have the goods, we want you in the movies.

We need new faces on the screen. it is one of the film industry's biggest problems. From its modest beginnings, the business has grown to colossal size today. Six million persons attend a motion picture show every day in the United States alone. This tremendous expansion has occurred so rapidly that we have not been able to find an develop enough skilled actors and actresses to fill all the important roles.

Each year finds bigger and better photoplays being produced than during the previous twelve months. Next year there will be an even larger number of high class pictures turned out than during the present year. This increased production is absolutely necessary to supply the enormously growing demand for entertainment imposed by the public of American and every other country in the world.

We have not been developing enough young actors each year to keep pace with the increased number of pictures.

That is why I say that the youth of America never has had such a wonderful chance to make t name in the movies as today.

(Continued Next Week)

FOR SAFETY -- CALL A
Premier CAB

MAIN 4200
Lowest Rates in the City

The Pheasant Room
AT WEST HOTEL

Table de Hote Luncheon, 60c
Special Plate Dinner, 70c to $1.00
A LA CARTE SERVICE

U. S. Window Cleaning Co.
719 New York Life Bldg.
WE CLEAN WINDOWS, FLOORS AND DWELLINGS
Contracts taken for everything in the Cleaning Line
ATLANTIC 4727


State Theatre program, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Movieland Magazine)

Free Shampoo!
With Every Marcel.....$1.00
Marcel and Bob Curl.....75c
Shampoo.....50c
With any of my expert operators, if you bring this ad with you.
Positively No Students Employed Here

HAIR SHINGLING.....
HAIR BOBBING..... 35c

Maxims Beauty Parlor
201-3 Yates Bldg. 823 Nicollet Ave.
Phone: Main 5454
Open Every Evening

Don't Worry
About Starting Your Car
After the Show
You'll have no trouble if it's loaded with
LITENING
GASOLINE

It's a cold weather gas -- full of pep and quick getaway. A thunderbolt of power.

Musical Moments
By William Warvelle Nelson

Sometimes words are written to music, more often music is composed to fit given lyrics. This procedure may be applied either way in the syncronization of music and the silent drama.

In the case of the Handel picture presented this week the various scenes were probably filmed with due regard to their adaptability to the music of Handel. In some cases, however, it would appear necessary to have the music actually performed by the orchestra, principals of the picture, etc., so that the entire composition would present a unified work of art.

 Most of the pictures presented at the State come to us without any musical accompaniment. We review the pictures in a small projection room back-stage, time each scene and make notes as to the character of music, tempo, etc., desired, after which we ransack our catalogs of music endeavoring to find just the exact selection for each particular scene. When one stops to consider that our library contains something like ten thousand selections, it will be seen that this is no matter to laugh off lightly.

Of course, in many cases the exact piece required is very obvious, such as in the matter of a direct cue or some scene which immediately suggests a certain composition. Sometimes, it is a matter of taste and the choice lies between several numbers, any of which might be equally acceptable. We always try to get the exact touch required. Sometimes we do better than others, but with every picture the same painstaking care is exercised in the selection of the music.


Photos from THE NIGHT CLUB (1925)

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Last Modified February 18, 2015