Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania - May 15, 1916

William S. Hart as THE ARYAN on the cover of the Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters program, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, for the week of May 15, 2015

GALA WEEK

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM
THE
===== THEATRES =====
OF THE BETHLEHEMS

SPECIAL MUSIC               SUPER PRODUCTIONS

PROGRAM, WEEK OF MAY 15th TO 20th

W. S. Hart as He Appears in "The Aryan" -- Triangle-Ince Play


Marguerite Clark in OUT OF THE DRIFTS in the Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters program in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

Marguerite Clark in "Out of the Drifts"

Miss Clark has never done anything more absorbingly interesting and more thoroughly sympathetic than Elise, the delightful little Alpine shepherdess in "Out of the Drifts." It is a great stroy of the great Alps and the everlasting snows. The superb little star is seen battling not only for life itself against the elements but to save herself from a young roue with whom a great avalanche has penned her in a deserted cabin. We have laughed and cried with Marguerite Clark in many funny and some touching situations, but in this story she gives us something entirely new -- the fearless, unspoiled girl of the mountains whose simple trust in mankind and her Maker steels her courage in time of peril and wins our heartfelt sympathy in moments of distress.

Happy little Elise first learns the meaning of sorrow when her father loses his footing in the St. Bernard Pass and dies in her arms leaving her alone in the world. Rudolph, an Alpine guide, is desperately in love with Elise, but she does not return his affections. There arrives at the monastery a young Englishman named Reggie Van Rensselaer, who has come to Switzerland to forget his past follies in London.

Instantly attracted by the beauty of Elise, Reggie meets and induces her to agree to accompany him to London in the belief that they are to be married there. but Rudolph discovers the real purpose behind Reggie's scheme and, in order to prevent it, he attempts to kill the stranger by cutting the guide-rope and sending him heading down the precipice over which he has been dangling.

Reggie survives the fall and is taken to elise's cabin where she is just rescued from him by the timely arrival of Rudoplh (sic), who has fought his way through the avalanche. There is a tremendous struggle in the cabin and Reggie finally leaves thoroughly chastened in body and spirit. The supreme devotion of Rudolph and the utter sophistication of Elise have their effect upon Reggie and he decides to live a different soft of life in the future.

So, when Rudolph goes to London in search of Reggie, with whom he realizes that Elise is still in love, he finds him devoting himself to charity. Overjoyed at the news that Elise has forgiven him, Reggie returns to Switzerland and to Elise.

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George Beban in AN ALIEN in the Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters program of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

George Beban in "An Alien," Playing Soon

"An Alien" Well Worth Seeing

By "Wid." the critic

By all means see George Began in "An Alien." I have seen mr. Beban in his sketch "The Sign of the Rose" at least six or seven times, having caught it in different vaudeville bills, and while I knew the story of the sketch "backwards," as the boy would say, still I can recommend this pciture presentation very, very highly, because I found myself thoroughly enjoying the power of Mr. Beban's work as I watched him on the screen. He lives that part -- he doesn't act it. His makeup is wonderful, in that he seems to "step into character." "An Alien" is certainly something worth while seeing.

("Wid" is almost certainly Wid Gunning, a film critic with his own magazine, Wid's.)

Lots of Comedy in "Little Meena."

A love affair between a poor little "Pennsylvania Dutch" girl and a baron salesman of patent clothes-wringers is the theme of "Little meena's Romance," a new Triangle-Fine Arts feature. She gets him out of jail when he is arrested for canvassing without a license, and in gratitude he provides her with books on self-improvement. They part, little knowing how much they mean to each other. The circumstances under which they meet later are unique in the annals of motion picture situations, but are full of human interest quality that provikes tears and laughter in swift succession.

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Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, program for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

The Lorenz Theatre Program

MONDAY AND TUESDAY          MAY FIFTEENTH AND SIXTEENTH

WILLIAM S. HART IN

"The Aryan"

William S. Hart, the acknowledged peer of Western character portrayers, is marvelous in this production. hart's rival for honors in this play is Bessie Love.

Added Attraction Monday, "WHO'S GUILTY," a series of dramas, each one complete.

Added Attraction Tuesday, "HIS LAST LAUGH," a Triangle-Keystone comedy.

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY     MAY SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH

MARGUERITE CLARK IN

"Out of the Drifts"

It is a great story of the Alps and the everlasting snows.

Added Attraction every Wednesday, "THE SOCIAL PIRATES," a complete story each week.

Added Attraction Thursday, "A DASH OF COURAGE," Triangle-Keystone Comedy.

Advanced prices Wed. and Thurs.: Matinee 10c., Evenings, 15c., 10c.

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Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, program for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

The Lorenz Theatre Program

FRIDAY          MAY NINETEENTH

DOROTHY GISH AND OWEN MOORE IN

"Little Meena's Romance"

A comedy picture of a Pennsylvania Dutch girl true to life.

Added Attraction, "THE IRON CLAW"

 

SATURDAY          MAY TWENTIETH

CHARLOTTE WALKER IN

"The Trail of the Lonesome Pine"

A beautiful picturization of the wonderful reigning theatrical success of recent years with the principle role played by the star who appeared in the part on the spoken stage for several seasons.

Added Attraction, "A DASH OF COURAGE," Triangle-Keystone Comedy.

Louise Would Just Have to be Kidnapped.

That William S. hart, who is starred in "The Aryan," Ince's Triangle-Kay Bee feature, is a man of unusual strength and a horseman of exceptional skill, is demonstrated in a number of thrilling scenes in the production.

Hart has the role of a young prospector, who, early in the picture, is duped out of his two years' saving by the clever ruse of a dance hall girl, a part played by Louise Glaum. To accomplish her end, the girl is forced to lie to him regarding the contents of a telegram which tells him of the mortal illnes of his mother. When he learns the truth, revenge fills the prospector's heart and mind. He goes to the dwelling of the girl and by main force drags her out to his horse, where he throws her over the animal's back, mounts and rids away at a gallop, answering, shot for shot, the volleys that are fired after him by the pursuing party.

To make the scene thoroughly realistic, Producer Ince instructed Miss Glaum to exert her full strength against Hart's endeavors to kidnap her. She did, with the result that she had to admit that if it had been a real kidnapping she wouldn't have had a chance against hart's strength.

Hart's flight from his pursuers is said to be one of the most thrilling scenes ever photographed.

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Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, program for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

Lehigh Orpheum Theatre Program

MONDAY AND TUESDAY          MAY FIFTEENTH AND SIXTEENTH

MARGUERITE CLARK IN

"Out of the Drifts"

A thrilling Paramount Picture of the Alpines.

Added Attraction every Tuesday, Tom Moore and Anna Nilsson in "WHO'S GUILTY," a series of complete dramas.

Advanced prices, Monday and Tuesday; Matinee. 10c.: Evenings, 15c., 10c.

WEDNESDAY          MAY SEVENTEENTH

DOROTHY GISH AND OWEN MOORE IN

"Little Meena's Romance"

A comedy picture of a Pennsylvania Dutch girl true to life.

Added Attraction "A DASH OF COURAGE", a Keystone Comedy.

THURSDAY          MAY EIGHTEENTH

CHARLOTTE WALKER IN

"The Trail of the Lonesome Pine"

A story of the Virginia mountains and the government crusade against illicit liquor traffic interrupted by an absorbing love story.

Added Attraction, "THE IRON CLAW"

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Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, program for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

Lehigh Orpheum Theatre Program

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY          MAY NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH

WILLIAM S. HART IN

"The Aryan"

This is declared to be one of the most tensely compelling narratives ever penned and suits to a nicety the capabilities of the screen's popular "Bad man."

Added Attraction, "HIS LAST LAUGH," a Keystone Comedy.

Makeup of "An Alien" Star Fools Appleman.

So perfect in every detail is George Began's makeup in "An Alien," adapted from "The Sign of the Rose," at the Astor Theatre, that in it he fooled the sons of Italy who, unaware of it, are seen in the film.

In one instance he approached an apple cart in East One hundred and Thirty-second Street and selected for himself those specimens of the fruit which particularly appealed to him.

The proprietor of the cart refused to accept the sum which "Pietro" offered him. The actor haggled over the price, and in a jumble of broken English here and there interspersed with Italian, he attempted to convince his friend that he could afford to pay no more.

The other was adamant. Beban grew more and more vehement. But in the end "Pietro" had to pay the price asked, meantime, unseen by the fruit vendor, the cameraman had been busily grinding away and had obtained many feed of valuable picture.

ANNA NILSSON (PATHE).
Heroine of "Who's Guilty"
Appearing every week. Each story complete

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Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, program for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

FRANK KEENAN
Triangle Picture Play Star

In "The Stepping Stone" the Triangle forces accomplished more than merely bringing back to Broadway in a strong part a popular star -- Frank Keenan -- supported by a strong cast and a lovely and sympathetic co-star in the person of Mary Boland. They attained the rare achievement of "putting over" most happily a romance of middle age -- something that, strangely enough, is very uncommon. --New York Telegraph

"Meena's Romance" Teaches Thrift

Thrifty people commonly are looked upon as people who are trying to save money. There are, however, thrifty persons who economize only because it has been bred in them, and not becaues (sic) they need money at all. Just such a person is little Meena, in "Little meena's Romance," a new Triangle-Fine Arts release.

She is a little dutch girl born and brought up on a farm in pennsylvania; and all she knows about life is that cleanliness is above godliness and that idleness is vice. Consequently, when after the death of her father, she goes to the magnificent New York home of her aunt to live, she nust naturally never thinks to tell them that in her old telescope-bag she has a fortune of her own.

In her luxurious surroundings, she tries to go on living in the old manner. She cannot bear to see the maid mopping off the front steps, but insists on getting down on her knees herself, with the scrubbing-brush. She cannot understand why, with so many servants, there should  be dust on the things in the foyer. In short, she makes herself very obnoxious to her relatives by obeying her ruling passion, the hatred of dirt, and they decide to send her back to her little Pennsylvania home. As she on't take their first hints, they put her bad into her arms. The the bag comes apart, revealing the treasure within. Of course that's different; so they let her stay.

Playing Lehigh Orpheum, Wednesday, May 17th, and at Lorenz Theatre, Friday, May 19th.

Charlotte Walker in "The Trail of the Lonesome Pine."

It was in the dramatic version of this beautiful story of the Cumberland mountains that Miss Walker scored her greatest triumph on the speaking stage.

The story of "The Trail of the Lonesome pine" has to do with the

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Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, program for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

love of a young Internal Revenue officer hunting for illegal moonshine whiskey stills in the remote mountain section of Virginia. There he meets "June," the beautiful daughter of old Judd Tolliver, head of the moonshiners. How the two fall in love, although enemies, how the moonshine traffic is broken up and the young officer wins over the Tolliver family must, naturally, be seen to be appreciated.

TOM MOORE (PATHE).

Tom Moore, who is alice Joyce's good looking husband, plays the leading role in "Who's Guilty," This new series will appear every Monday at the Lorenz Theatre and every Tuesday at the Lehigh Orpheum. Each story is complete.

Hart's Beginning.

That William S. Hart, the star of "The Aryan," is so true to the life of the west is because he was raised on the plains of North Dakota among the Sioux Indians. Surrounded by soldiers at an army post, he had set his heart on becoming a soldier; but coming East to enter a military academy, he drifted into acting.

UNIQUE MUSIC FOR GALA WEEK AT LORENZ THEATRE.

The management of the Lorenz Theatre considers itself very fortunate in having secured for Gala Week, Mr. Thomas Achenback, the well known violin soloist of Easton, Pa., and Mr. Albert Bodie, the celbrated pianist, late of Phila., now a resident of Bethlehem, who will assist Mr. Raynold Peters at the organ, in presenting a pleasing and unique musical  program.

This same combination is used at the Waldorf-Astoria, New York City.

"Who's Guilty?"

Has a surgeon the right to operate on his own wife? Has he this right even if she refuses to permit any other surgeon to perform the operation?

This is a unique point raised in "Puppets of Fate," the first of the pathe-Arrow "Who's Guilty?" series of photoplays, shown at the Lorenz Theatre every Monday and at the lehigh orpheum every Tuesday.

Of course, such an operation violates the technical ethics of the medical and surgical professions. the counsels of his fellows demand that -- except in a highly urgent case, with no aid nearby -- a surgeon must refrain from operating on any member of his immediate family. But what about the moral -- yes, and more important, perhaps, the legal -- aspects of the case?

In hardly a state in the Union is there legal provision prohibiting a surgeon from operating on his wife or child or parent. Despite the grave consequences which might surround such an operation, our legislatures seem singularly indifferent to the need of laws governing situationsof this sort. Yet, right now, we have a deadly parallel to cite.

Suppose Dr. walter Waite, the new York dentist, who admits having administered arsenic to his father-in-law, had been a surgeon instead of dentist. Suppose, further, that -- as he easily could -- he manufactured an apparent need for an operation. Had he killed his father-in-law on the operating table -- an intentional slip

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Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, program for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

of the scalpel easily could b emade to look like accident -- how could he have been caught and punished?

In "Puppets of Fate," a comparatively young surgeon has risen brilliantly to the top of his profession. He has a wife, who, though she loves him sincerely, is really doubtful of his abilitites. Her unbelief in his powers tends to haper him. At the very moment when he might become head surgeon of a new hospital, endowed by a wealthy young widow, his wife's refusal to engage in the social duties which his rising career forces upon him threatens to end his ambitions.

The young widow and a number of the female sycophants who natually flutter about to a beautiful woman gifted with brains and money turn the young surgeon's head. Ultimately the widow and the surgeon believe they love each other. The widow proposes to him that he arrange a divorce from his wife. Almost at the moment when he consents, his wife is stricken with a malady which requires instant surgical attention. He summons a famous surgeon. but his wife demands that he perform the opeation, and the famous surgeon consents to aid the younger man.

At the most ticklish juncture of the delicate brain operation the young surgeon lets his mind slip from his immediate work to dwell, ever so briefly, on the widow. There is a fatal error, a mere slip of the knife, and death comes swiftly to his wife. The widow believes that he young surgeon has deliberately chosen death instead of divorce to free himself of his marriage. His own profession drives him forth. his career is ruined. He sinks to the very dregs.

Yet, who is really guilty? The young surgeon? Or was it the widow who lured him, or thewife who did not at first believe in him,or the great surgeon who permitted the violation of his professional code? Or can we trace it farther still, to take the failure of our law-makers to make such a situation impossible. Who really is guilty?

Pearl White, Shrinking Violet.

Seventeen stories above the street, in an eighty-mile breeze, on a scaffold that kissed, at intervals, the bare unsympathetic wall of the Garard Building at No. 729 Seventh Ave., New York, Pearl White, the Path "Peerless, Fearless Girl," playing the leading role in "The Iron Claw," looked down into the stret (sic) below, turned meditatively to the sign painter she was assisting, and delivered herself as follows: "Look at those street cleaners down there, Gus, in amongst all that traffic on Broadway. There's a job I wouldn't take, if I were a man, for love nor money. Think of the chances they take!" And she turned pensively away the while the crowds in the street below looked up with eye popping and mouths wide.

Douglas Fairbanks.

Douglas Fairbanks, whose genial happy personality is such an asset in gaining the good will and enthusiasm of an audience, made his theatrical debut fourteen years ago. Since entering motion picture work, Fairbanks has made such a hit that he will confine himself solely to that field for the next three years in Triangle plays under the supervision of David W. Griffith. Since 1901 he supported the most prominent stars of the speaking stage and has been a star in his own right. For several years under the direction of William A. Brady, he played in such successful pieces as "The Pit, "The Man of the Hour" and "The Gentleman from Mississippi." More recently he has appeared in "Officer 66," "Hawthorne of the U.S.A., "The New henrietta" and "The Show Shop." He has also appeared occasionally in vaudeville with his well-known sketch "A Regular Business Man." His latest and greatest hit in the motion drama was in "The Good Bad Man."

Upon request this program will be mailed to you each week.

THE THEATRES OF THE BETHLEHEMS


Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, program for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

Big Attractions that will Appear at the Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theatres

Geo. Beban in "An Alien"
Frank Keenan and Mary boland in "The Stepping Stone"
Blanche Sweet in "Blacklist"
Lillian Gish in "Sold for Marriage"
Douglas Fairbanks in "The Good Bad Man"
Fannie Ward in "For the Defense"
Mary Pickford in "The Eternal Grind"
Wallace Reid and Mae Murray in "To Have and to Hold"
Marguerite Clark in "Molly Make Believe

"WHO'S GUILTY"

A series of dramas each one complete
Every Monday at The Lorenz Theatre
Every Tuesday at The Lehigh Orpheum Theatre

ANNA NILSSON AND TOM MOORE
Featured in "Who's Guilty"
Stories by Mrs. Wilson Woodrow

Bethlehem Printing Company,
Bethlehem, PA.

THE THEATRES OF THE BETHLEHEMS


Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theaters of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, program for the week of May 15, 2015

LORENZ AND LEHIGH ORPHEUM

George Beban in "An Alien"
The Play that Makes Dimples to Catch the Tears
TOOK NEW YORK BY STORM!

What critics say about it:
"A Masterpiece"     Moving Picture World

"A Superfeature"     N. Y. Morning Telegraph

"Just About Perfect"     Motion Picture News

"Huge Success"     N. Y. Journal

"If there was a dry eye in the Theatre it must have been a glass one." -- New York Herald

THEY KNOW WHAT THEY ARE TALKING ABOUT

----- Playing at -----

The Lorenz Theatre, Wednesday, May 24th

Lehigh Orpheum Theatre, Thursday, May 25th

Advances Prices

THE THEATRES OF THE BETHLEHEMS


Photos from A DASH OF COURAGE (1916)

More Information on the Lorenz and Lehigh Orpheum Theatres...

The Lorenz Theatre at CinemaTreasures.com

The Lehigh Orpheum Theatre at Cinema Treasures.com


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Last Modified May 22, 2016