Clothes (1914)

Postcard for CLOTHES (1914).

"Thanks, God, for making mother think of me!"
Grace George's Famous Success
"CLOTHES"
in MOTION PICTURES
Produced by the Famous Players Film Co.

Postcard for CLOTHES (1914).

"If you squeal, I'll kill you!"
Grace George's Famous Success
"CLOTHES"
in MOTION PICTURES
Produced by the Famous Players Film Co.

House Peters (center).

Postcard for CLOTHES (1914) with House Peters.

"He is the man!"
Grace George's Famous Success
"CLOTHES"
in MOTION PICTURES
Produced by the Famous Players Film Co.

House Peters, Edward MacKay and unknown.

Postcard for CLOTHES (1914) with Charlotte Ives and House Peters.

"You would sell your soul for Clothes!"
Grace George's Famous Success
"CLOTHES"
in MOTION PICTURES
Produced by the Famous Players Film Co.

Charlotte Ives and Edward MacKay

Postcard for CLOTHES (1914) with Charlotte Ives and House Peters.

"The soul is greater than all the clothes that cover it!"

Grace George's Famous Success
"CLOTHES"
in MOTION PICTURES
Produced by the Famous Players Film Co.

Charlotte Ives and Edward MacKay

Postcard for CLOTHES (1914).

Post Card

This side may be used for correspondence

"CLOTHES," the sensational dramatic success that sharted metropolitan society, by Avery hopwood and Channing Pollock, presents a powerful contrast between love and desire, sham and sincerity. It is based upon Carlyle's immortal line, "Society is founded upon cloth." In motion pictures with Charlotte ives (in the role made famous in the original production by Grace George) and a notable cast, including House Peters.

New York   FPF   U. S. A.

PASTIME THEATRE
SEP 9   1914

Pub. by Kraus Mfg. Co., New York

(The back of all of these postcards is the same.)

Postcard for CLOTHES (1914) with Charlotte Ives

Just for the sake of society.

Grace George's Famous Success
"CLOTHES"
in MOTION PICTURES
Produced by the Famous Players Film Co.

Charlotte Ives

Postcard for CLOTHES (1914).

Post Card

This side may be used for correspondence

"CLOTHES," the sensational dramatic success that sharted metropolitan society, by Avery hopwood and Channing Pollock, presents a powerful contrast between love and desire, sham and sincerity. It is based upon Carlyle's immortal line, "Society is founded upon cloth." In motion pictures with Charlotte ives (in the role made famous in the original production by Grace George) and a notable cast, including House Peters.

New York   FPF   U. S. A.

Majestic Theatre Today
Matinee at 2 p.m.

Postmarked June 3, 1914, Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania
Mrs. W. S. Brown
North Penn St.
City

Pub. by Kraus Mfg. Co., New York


"Clothes" Proves Highly Entertaining
Well Adapted to Pictures

THE interest in four reels of "Clothes," the Famous Players' Film Company's latest production, could easily have encompassed an extra reel or two as the story is of the quality that interests and satisfies; and the spectator desires more of it. The society drama which has for its authors Avery Hopwood and Channing Pollock, makes a subject especially adaptable to the screen and is presented with Charlotte Ives and a cast in which the work of House Peters, Edward MacKay and Josephine Drake stands out notably. There are fine interiors and beautiful clothes to be admired and chief amond those who have a variety of costumes and wears them well, is Josephine Drake as Mrs. Watling.

House Peters, as Arnold West, the man with fake mining stock to sell, and who sells it, gives a finished rendition of West in his sane and not so sane moments. Edward Mackay is liked as Richard Burbank, the millionaire, and the spectators are more than willing that he should be the chosen of Olive Sherwood, the girl with a too great fondness for clothes. As Miss Sherwood, Miss Ives appeals and is readily liked. Minna Gale Haynes is good as Mrs. Cathcart, Olive's aunt, and Frederick Webber, as Horace Watline, impresses with the frankness and manliness of that character. Little Ruth Watline is portrayed by five-year old Mimi Yvonne who is excellent.

Because Olive Sherwood has developed a too great fondness for clothes, her father, afflicted with an illness which shortly ends his life, invests in Red Star Mining stock, hoping that its dividends will provide his daughter with the comforts of life. Arnold West is the exploiter of this stock. He meets Olive and falls in love with her. After her father's death he assures her that the stock will net her a comfortable income and advises her to come to New York and make her home with her cousin, Mrs. Cathcart. The Watlings, former Omaha neighbors of Olive's, have moved to the metropolis and prospered and when a member of the Watling's set. Here she meets Richard Burbank the young millionaire. They have a mutual love for little Ruth Watling and with Mr. Watling are the only happy moments in the life of the little girl, who mother has heeded the call of "clothes" and neglects her.

West pays Olive supposed dividends and with some of the money settles a gown bill for her, the receipt showing her indebtedness to him. With a new wardrobe, also purchased with this money, she attends a house-party at the Watling's winter home. Burbank proposes and is accepted. Reviewing the happy occurrence, she is started by West's entering her room and forcing his attentions upon her. Her aunt comes to her rescue. Burbank and Mrs. Watling are summoned and in the presence of the guests West is brought to account. Displaying his check-book with its tell-tale receipt, Olive is put in disgrace and leaves quietly for her old home in Omaha. Watling, ruined though his investments in Red Star mining stock, takes his little family back to Omaha. West's office assistant convinces Burbank that Olive is innocent of any wrong and when Burbank receives a not from Ruth telling him of Olive's presence in Omaha, he goes there and the result is a pretty reconciliation. West, from an over-dose of "dope" meets a sudden death.

-- Motography, March 21, 1914, pp. 193-194


with Charlotte Ives and House Peters. Directed by Francis Powers. Famous Players.

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Last Modified April 23, 2018